To all our Baristas, we thank you!

A few of us here at Barefoot Physiotherapy are big coffee connoisseurs. Whether it is a strong flat white, soy latte, piccolo or a long black with a ‘dash of cold milk’, we know exactly what we want and how we want it. We love our local barista’s who know just how to make our morning coffee, so while they are looking after our coffee cravings, it’s important to also look after your well being while standing at the coffee machine.

I saw a funny sign the other day at our local coffee shop saying; “Relationship Status: Emotionally Dependant on my Barista”. So we thought we do a little shout out to all the amazing Barista’s out there that put a bounce, a smile and a little cup of happiness in to the lives of so many of us. We thought we would send out a little love to our Baristas as we know working day-in-day-out at those coffee machines can actually be quite taxing on your body.

At a lot of the really busy coffee shops, some Baristas could be smashing out over 100 coffees per hour. This seems like a huge number, but it is most definitely a reality for the buzzing cafes around Brisbane. Being on your feet all day is tiring and can be quite a strain on your body.

Be sure you are doing your best to maintain a good posture, keeping your shoulders down and your back as relaxed as possible. Try and alternate hands where possible, especially when there is jarring movements involved such as using the grinding chamber handle, or tapping the milk jug on the table to remove excess bubbles.

Be sure to avoid looking down for long periods of time. If at all possible, try and ensure the coffee grinder is at a level where you do not have to look down too far to avoid continual strain on your neck, and when pouring your milk, try not to crouch over the coffee cup, keen a straight back and keep your shoulders down.

The more relaxed you feel while you work hard to get coffees out to your customers, the better you will feel at the end of the shift. Be sure to do some shoulder, glute and calf releases, and maybe a roll on a foam roller to stretch your back out so you can be ready for another day of serving up delicious cups of coffee.

To all the Baristas out there, our days would not have quite the same hop, skip and a jump in them, so thank you!

If you would like to read more, or book an appointment with one of our physios, click here!

What makes Barefoot unique?

What makes Barefoot different?

Ever wondered what makes Barefoot Physiotherapy is different? When your body isn’t operating as you want it to, every part of your life suffers. We get it, we’ve been there. Every Australian deserves to live life to the fullest and not have injury and pain hold them back – so let the practitioners at one of Queensland’s trusted physiotherapy clinics help you out.

Our clients travel from far and wide across Australia. People come to Barefoot Physiotherapy from Melbourne, the Gold Coast, and the Northern Territory Outback to be treated right alongside our local clients in Graceville, Indooroopilly and Yeronga. Our experienced Sports Physiotherapist learn about their health goals and help them to get their bodies back working the way they want them.

Every day we are inspired by the amazing and beautiful people that come to our clinic. We are lucky enough to make a noticeable difference in people’s lives and coming to work is a delight.

Physio Services in Indooroopilly

What does treatment look like at Barefoot Physiotherapy?

Physiotherapy treatment at Barefoot follows the Barefoot Physiotherapy Plan. Our goal is to help you be able to do what you want with your body. We use a thorough whole body assessment to work out the underlying cause of the condition. We can then treat it, teach you to treat it and together take care of your body, long term.

You will experience a systematic, thorough testing process that identifies the underlying cause of your condition.

This assessment includes testing your:

  • nerves
  • muscles (including tendons)
  • joints (ligaments, discs, bones, cartilage) and
  • movements.

What’s next?

In the vast majority of sports and musculoskeletal conditions, this process leads to a rapid and full recovery. During this initial phase, you can trust that you are either going to get rapidly fixed, or a ‘Plan B’ is required.

In a small percentage of conditions, this process quickly identifies that a referral for a different management of the condition is most appropriate, i.e. ‘Plan B’ where we help you find the right path (whether that be imaging, acupuncture, medical etc.) – this is because we don’t continue treating without results.

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For the majority of cases (not a Plan B case) treatment then focusses on the underlying cause to reduce its impact on the rest of your body.

We chart your progress including how long and how many sessions will be required to achieve pain free, full function. Below is an example recovery graph.

Importantly – this involves teaching you how to look after your condition to minimise recurrence. Click here for muscle retraining.

Once you are back doing what you want with your body, looking after your condition is the mainstay of treatment. We call this the ‘maintenance phase’ where your Barefoot Physiotherapist checks in on you at increasing intervals (up to 3 months).

There are three main reasons for these sessions:

1. To test and confirm your good self-management
2. Progressing your skills for achieving better performance
3. To treat any re-accumulation of strain that occurred in between sessions as a result of life’s challenges

Barefoot Physiotherapy also runs sessions in the gym, workplace or home (where appropriate) for clients to:

  • Optimise motor control and postures
  • Improve progression from injured to non-injured state
  • Minimise avoidable strain placed on the body (and therefore decrease the frequency of maintenance sessions in the clinic).

Our clients find these sessions very valuable and highly specific to them. Want to find our more, click here to view our Barefoot Lifestyle guide. 

Five steps to living your Barefoot Lifestyle

Ever get that feeling like life is just passing by? Like you want to be out on the field playing but you’re hanging on the sideline ? Are you wondering what it would look like if you were living your “Barefoot Lifestyle”?

You know you enjoy being fully part of it, in fact maybe you used to be a key player but it now feels like you’ve forgotten the moves?

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We get it, your life can get busy and it’s very easy to let the things that are important to you slip down the list of priorities in the midst of your day to day.

Our Barefoot Lifestyle Guide is a reflection tool to help you think… think through the things in your life that are important to you… remind yourself of the things that you enjoy…  so you can include more of these in your days and get your life back on track.

Sometimes it’s easy to get caught up in the mundane and forget about the bigger picture. You know, that bigger picture where you know how you make this world a better place, where you have passions and drive and talk about them. Why is it important to focus on that bigger picture and live it rather than dream it? I think we would all agree this leads to a more fulfilled life for yourself and the people around you.

In no way is the Barefoot Lifestyle Guide telling you how to live your life… it’s a way to get you thinking about how you want to live on your terms and helping you to go out and do it!

We all have the resources within us that we need to make our lives even more enjoyable. It’s amazing how much you can discover about yourself when you just ask the right questions.

The Barefoot Lifestyle looks at areas that we believe are important to living a fulfilled happy life
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  1. Staying active
  2. Taking care of your body and mind
  3. Friends and family
  4. Your vocation
  5. Doing your bit to change the world

What you will create by completing the Guide are immediately actionable steps as part of our ‘Barefoot Choose-to’ list. Here you can come up with a list of things you choose to do (or do more of) that really satisfies the inner you.

It’s a great feeling completing the guide knowing you’ve delved a little deeper. And reminded yourself of those enjoyable crazy things you love to do!

So, if you can spare 30min today, download the lifestyle guide and complete the action steps on your ‘Choose-to’ list. Even just one step a day, is enough to transform your life, and get your SOUL (as well as you body) feeling like it is on holiday everyday!

To download the lifestyle guide, click here.

The Barefoot Physiotherapy Plan

Discuss your Problems:

Our holistic therapy approach is based on a partnership between you and us. This starts by us truly knowing and understanding your story and why you have come to Barefoot for help.

We then use specific nerve and orthopaedic tests to determine our initial hands on treatment that starts you on the road to recovery, be it back pain physiotherapy or posture training.

As you progress we utilise our full body assessment and testing to determine the root cause of your problem. We then treat it, teach you how to treat it and teach you how to take care of it for now and the future.

Throughout this process we will incorporate postural retraining, strength work and individualised education to ensure you understand what is best for your body.

What You Need and Require:

Treatment doesn’t begin and end within the four walls of our clinic.

If you need us to assess your posture at your workplace, we’ll be there.   If you’d like us to collaborate with your personal trainer on which specific exercises to focus on (and avoid), we’re happy to help.

Working in with your broader “support team” is one of the best ways in which we can support you back to optimum health.

And if for any reason you’re not getting results, we’ll work with you to find alternatives. We’ll closely monitor your progress, with the goal of getting you out of pain and back doing what you love. Our success is measured by your results, nothing else.

We’ll Create a Treatment Plan for Current Pain and Underlying Cause

From the thorough assessment we compile a list of significant findings in your body. These findings relate to your joints, muscles and movements which can be linked to your nerves, thoughts and worries.

From the list, you and your therapist will prioritise which key findings to test first. These findings are tested by performing TDTs (Treatment-Direction-Tests) to the limited movements in your body. Most of the time, we find that that the underlying cause is not exactly where you are feeling your symptoms. We discuss this with you during your session or you can have a read about it on our website in more detail.

We’ll Teach You to Take Care of Your Body to Avoid Reoccurrence of the Pain

Once we confirm the underlying cause we will treat it to reduce its impact on the rest of your body. We continually reassess your movements, muscles and joints to measure the improvements from your treatment. This confirms we are on the right track, and on the way to help you reach your goals.

Our focus is to prevent build-up of strain to the primary cause of your condition. We do this by:

  1. A) Teaching you to treat the structure yourself or how someone else can help you treat it (e.g. partner, family member, friend)
  2. B) Teaching you how to use your body in a way to prevent build-up of strain on that area. This can be by changing your posture at work or strengthening a specific muscle group.

We understand this is different for everyone, so we tailor it to you! If you have particular posture or performance questions, feel free to ask the physio during your session and we will address this when appropriate.

We’ll Craft a Plan for Health Maintenance to Ensure Your Body Stays Happy

To ensure your body stays in optimal shape and you prevent future injury, it is important that you check in with us at increasing intervals for “tune up” sessions. In these sessions we focus on prevention, to help you to continue living your Barefoot lifestyle.

As well as continuing treatment to the primary cause of your condition, we may also need to treat some secondary areas in your body. These secondary areas are findings that make some improvements to one or two things in your body (not as significant as the primary cause), but play an important role in keeping your body functioning at it’s highest level.

Our goal is to empower you to confidently live the life you choose!

Getting Swim Fit

Have you been itching to get back in the water after years of dry feet? Are you new to swimming and just don’t know where to start? Have you signed up for a triathlon and need to get back into the pool for those fun squad sessions?

The most incredible thing about swimming is that it is for every walk of life. It doesn’t matter what you look like, how old you are, how fit you are, or how big you are, swimming covers everyone’s wants and needs. Regardless of your ability, technique or experience, everyone can swim. Swimming is a low impact, aerobic exercise that everyone benefits from.

Element Swimming’s Head Coach, Ben Geard, has given us a few helpful tips below on how to get back into the pool and incorporate swimming into you fitness routine.

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  1. Grab some gear. It may sound a little silly, but before you get ready to take your first dive, ensure you have the correct equipment to help you along. Ideally you will have swimwear that fits correctly so you aren’t needing to pull everything back into place after your first dive. Once you have that covered, invest in some goggles and a swim cap (especially for those with lots of hair). Then you have the option of handy equipment for your swim that can help mix your laps up a bit, such as fins, a kick board and a pull-buoy.
  2. Start slow. If you haven’t been swimming for a while, be sure to start out slow and steady. Swim fitness is easy to gain, but also easy to lose. If it’s been a good chunk of time since your last swim, be sure you take it easy so you don’t scare yourself out of your next swim before you’re even out of the pool the first time round. Start off by swimming some easy laps with plenty of rest in between. Don’t forget about your fins, kickboard and pull-buoy. These will help give you a bit of variety throughout each swim while working on different parts of your body. Don’t forget about breaststroke, backstroke and the all-time favourite butterfly to keep things interesting.
  3. Build your routine. Don’t overdo it by setting your expectations of swim training for every day of the week. Start with just once or twice times a week, and if you feel you need more, then gradually add the extra days in over time.
  4. Swimming Fitness South BrisbaneSet realistic goals. Don’t discourage yourself by setting unrealistic goals. There are plenty of different targets to set in swimming that don’t just include how fast you can go. Think about mastering your technique and efficiency, or how many laps you can do without taking a break. Make sure you avoid increasing your weekly distance by more than 10%. This will not only give you a good indication of your improvement, but it will also help avoid injury.
  5. Join a Squad. Now this is what makes swimming fun and social. Find a swim pool with a great coach, fun group of like-minded people and times that suit your schedule. This can truly help with your motivation and personal accountability. This is a great way to further improve your technique, fitness and meet some new people.

Don’t forget to stretch and release. Before and after each session make sure you prioritise stretching, and be sure to do regular releases in between your sessions. This is great recovery and will help in preventing you getting tight, especially in the neck, shoulders and back.

Race day ready!

Running Race Ready Most people put a lot of time and effort into preparing their body for a goal race. This is great, however not having a plan for race day can mean you don’t run to your full potential and may end up feeling disappointed. That’s where these ‘top tips’ come in handy! As an eight-time Australian representative runner, I have done my fair share of ‘race-day’ preparation and have compiled my thoughts on how to have your best race possible. These are written from my perspective as a 400m runner, however they are applicable from shorter track races up to marathon.

  • TaperYou need to ‘taper’. This means that the week leading into your race, your training should be lighter than normal. Depending on how much running you normally do and how far your goal race is, will determine how many days out you start your taper and how much you run during your taperDon’t do too little though. Just as a taper is important, doing nothing for a few days leading upto your race can make your legs feel ‘heavy’. It is often best to head out 1-2 days before your race and do a short, easy run (about 5 minutes if doing a 5km race), some gentle stretching and 3-5 x 50-100m runs just a bit faster than your intended racing pace
  • NutritionWhile we have all heard of ‘carb loading’, it is often not necessary for races shorter than a half marathon, so no need to binge on pasta. If you think a carb loading is necessary for your race, it is best to consult a sport dietician to establish a protocol that is appropriate for you.What is more important, is eating healthy balanced meals for the week leading into your race. This continual input of nutrients will help your body be at its best come race day, and also minimise any negative effects if you are too nervous to eat on the day of competing. Most road races start early in the morning, so it is ideal to eat a good balanced meal the night before, with slightly more carbohydrates than usual. It is also a good idea to steer clear of any particularly strong flavours (eg garlic, chilli, curry) as these can upset the stomach with the added nerves of racing or be on your breathe the next morning which is not very pleasant!

    On race day morning it is best to have a light meal that is predominantly carbohydrates as this is more quickly digested by the body and less likely to upset your stomach. Some suggestions are cereal with milk, toast with jam or honey or fruit with a small amount of yoghurt. If you are doing a half marathon or longer, it is likely you will need to take some fuel on board during your race. It is best to consult a sports dietician a few months beforehand regarding this.

    Most of my races are in the afternoon or evening, so I generally have a chicken and salad sandwich on wholemeal bread 4 hours before racing and then a small serve of yoghurt and berries 2 hours before go-time.

  • Race Ready 3Hydration
    As with nutrition, it is important to be consciously hydrating for the week leading into your race as this will optimise your body’s function come race day and also avoid ‘over-hydrating’ the day before and spending all night in the bathroom. For 5km runs, it is often not necessary to take on fluid during your race. If you think you will need to drink during your race, it is a good idea to practice this in the lead up to ensure your stomach is comfortable with it
  • Sleep
    Most people can get nervous in the lead up to a race and it is very normal not to sleep well the night before. There is a lot of evidence that a few nights of poor sleep does not negatively impact on performance, so long as you don’t get stressed about it! Trying to sleep well for the week leading up to your race will also help limit any negative effects of a poor night sleepRunning Race Ready
  • Getting ready!
    I usually find it is best to set out my race outfit, race number with safety pins and pre-packed bag (towel, music, warm clothes etc) the night before racing. This helps me stay calm as I am confident everything is already prepared. Then it is a matter of working my time backwards. Know what time your race starts and decide how much before it you want to get there, how long will it take to get there (including any road closures occurring for the course), how long will it take you to get ready and how long beforehand do you want to eat. This helps create an easy timeline for when you need to wake up, eat and leave to minimise stress.I suggest arriving at the race start at least half an hour before. Allow extra time if it is unfamiliar environment, you need to park or you are dropping your bag off to the baggage tent (check beforehand that your race has this option!)
  • Warm up
    I recommend doing a warm up similar to the light session a few days before racing. A short, easy jog (only 1-2 minutes if doing a 5km), some gentle dynamic stretches and a few 50m runs at a faster pace. Give yourself time to do this (10-15 minutes), then 5 minutes to get to the start line ready to race!
  • Racing!
    Racing should be fun! Even if your goal is just to finish- know that you have worked hard to get to that point and deserve to enjoy the experience. Smile and appreciate all the other people around you who are also working hard to accomplish their goals. Be proud of yourself, regardless of the outcome

If you would like my help or have specific race day preparation questions, feel free to book a session or send me an email

Preventing a Climbing Injury

climb-4Climbing is a high demand sport. No question about that. When looking at other sports that are such high demand it is protocol to run through some form of warm-up. All too many times I have gone down to on of Brisbane’s Climbing Spots, Kangaroo Point cliffs and witnessed people just rock up, set-up their gear and get right into their climb. We have all been there, myself included. We’re time crunched, with no time for anything but pumping out a few climbs, right? Sometimes you’ll start with an easier climb, but for the most part no warm up required….

And this is how we set ourselves up for injury.

So why is warming up so important?

Prepares you physically and mentally for the climb by:

  • Increasing blood flow to the muscles
  • Increasing body temperature which increases tissue elasticity and thus increasing joint/muscle range of motion
  • Increasing neuromuscular co-ordination (muscles will fire in the pattern appropriate to climb)
  • Helping you get your head in the game

Prevent Climbing InjuryHow to do a proper climbing warm-up:

  1. Do a general warm up to get your blood flowing and your temperature up: jog, skip, jumping jacks, body weight lunges and squats
  2. If you feel restricted somewhere after your general warm-up you can do some dynamic stretches for the area. This type stretching is done with movement that will prepare the muscles to work rather than relax them into a state they don’t function optimally. Similarly, muscle releases can increase range of motion without affecting strength or performance. NO static stretch prior to climbing. *note static stretching and release work is definitely encouraged post climb!*
  3. Bouldering/easy climbs practicing various holds and moves you expect to use climbing that day. Brisbane Climbing at KP has a range of climbs so you can build into your work out.

A good warm up is key to getting things working from the start and preventing injury!

Other Factors to help Prevent Climbing Injury

Being properly hydrated

Getting enough sleep to allow adequate muscle healing/regeneration

Proper Nutrition: adequate carbohydrate, protein, vitamin C and E

Strength training

New Year Running Program!

Running Physio - 5km run - trainingWith the New Year upon us, many of us are setting health and fitness goals to keep us motivated and focused for
2017. This is a great way to stay committed to looking after your health. However, to truly take great care of yourself, it is important to take a gradual approach to new activities to allow your body time to adapt and minimise the risk of injury. Too often we see people dive head-first into a new exercise or activity without preparing their body and end up stiff, sore and side-lined from working towards their goal. Taking the time to plan and prepare for starting a new activity can help eliminate the need for time-off later on.

One of the most common goals we see people setting for themselves is a target running race. Whether it be the Gold Coast marathon, the Bridge to Brisbane 5km or anything in between! To help you on your way to achieving your running goals, below is a suggested program for working towards a 5km run. This is targeted at people who are currently active in some way, but have not done much running recently.

Sports Physio - 5km runIt is very easy to get focused on just running, when your goal is running related. However running is a high load activity on the body- it is essentially single leg squat jumps one after another for minutes on end! As such it is important to give your body time to rest and recover from running days- especially when it is new. Strength training also plays an important role in achieving your running goals. Resistance training that focuses on trunk and pelvic stability and glute/quad/calf strength will not only reduce your risk of injury but also improve your performance.

Last but not least, make sure that whatever your new health and fitness goals are, you tell your physio! We can help you formulate an appropriate strength program, ensure you are moving well in all the right areas and have self-management strategies to take care of your body between sessions.

Watch this space for more information about running injury prevention and overall body maintenance in the coming weeks. Until then- happy running!

 

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
Week 1  Strength training Walk 15 minutes Rest Strength training Run 1 min; walk 1 min for 10 minutes
Week 2

 

Releases/stretches/yoga Strength training Walk 20 minutes Rest Strength training Run 2 min; walk 1 min for 10 minutes
Week 3 Releases/stretches/yoga Strength training Run 2 mins; walk 1 min x 15 mins Rest Strength training Run 2 mins; walk 30 seconds for 10 minutes
Week 4

 

Releases/stretches/yoga Strength training 5 minutes Rest Strength training Run 5 minutes x 2 (1-3 minutes walking rest between)
Week 5

 

Releases/stretches/yoga Strength training 5 minutes x 3

(1-3 minutes walking rest between)

Rest Strength training Run 10 mins
Week 6

 

Releases/stretches/yoga Strength training 5 minutes x 5 (1-3 minutes walking rest between) Rest Strength training Run 3km! (this is a good ‘check-in’)
Week 7

 

Releases/stretches/yoga Strength training 10 minutes x2-3 (1-3 minutes walking rest between) Rest Strength training Run 15 minutes
Week 8 Releases/stretches/yoga Strength training 15 minutes x 2 (1-3 minutes walking rest between) Rest Strength training Run 20 minutes
Week 9 Releases/stretches/yoga Strength training 15 minutes x3 (1-3 minutes walking rest between) Rest Strength training Run 25 minutes
Week 10 Releases/stretches/yoga Strength training 15 minutes x3 (1-3 minutes walking rest between) Rest 5 minutes easy 5km goal run!